Beginnings

Appendix B:  Initial Visioning Sketches
Appendix B; Photo 1

2000-2009:  Center for Restorative Justice

  • Victim Offender Reconciliation Program (VORP) was started and worked in Holmes and Wayne counties mediating cases between victims and offenders with the intent of bringing resolution for all parties involved.

 

July 16, 2014:  Community visioning for development of healthy conflict management resources for Holmes and Wayne counties

  • Included 18 stakeholders from Holmes/Wayne counties with a diverse representation of occupations. (See Appendix A)
  • Opportunities and Needs:
  1. Third-party services
  2. Education and training
  3. Organizational consulting and capacity building
  4. Court and police referrals (e.g., VORP)
  5. Family and interpersonal conflicts
  • Common Themes (See Appendix B)
  1. Education and Training as a central focus
  2. Network Focus (organic connections; using natural networks)
  3. Central hub that can pull things together and disseminate technical skills and information
  4. Faith-based component (if not at the center, then as the foundation), but reaching out to the community
  5. Organic model—natural growth

 

September 2014 - December 2014:  Next Steps/putting wheels on the vision that was cast

  • Led by 12 individuals: Michael Amstutz, Larry Augsburger, Chet Eshlemen, Brad Fraelich, Kim Hartman, Dave Limbach, Matt Hamsher, Mark Leinbach, Gaye Santoro, Dayna Schrock, Sue Steiner, Lydell Steiner.
  • Met for three meetings and developed a job description and directive for a more formal steering committee.  (See Appendix C)
  • Goal:  Develop a platform for improving the conflict competence of residents and organizations in Holmes and Wayne Counties.  This will be achieved by:
  1. Networking: Identify and match current community assets (people/organizations/resources) with community needs and opportunities.
  2. Training: Develop capacity within individuals and organizations to address and manage conflict in healthy ways.
  3. Services: Respond to conflicts (in families, businesses, churches, courts, neighbors) with tools such as facilitation, mediation, arbitration, circles, etc.

 

February 2015 - August 2016:  Steering Committee 

  • Led by 12 individuals: Kyle Barnes, Deborah Dutcher, Brad Fraelich, Mindy Fraelich, Kim Hartman, Dayna Schrock, Janice Shroyer, Corey Spitler, Lydell Steiner, Matt Hamsher, Mark Leinbach, Chris White
  • Primary tasks:
  1. Dream and believe that we can improve our conflict competence
  2. Develop a vision and mission statement
  3. Select and design name and logo
  4. Set up non-profit status
  5. Develop website
  6. Begin initial networking and outreach to the community

Appendix D:  Minutes from first Steering Committee meeting, February 23, 2015
Appendix E:  Minutes from visioning meeting, August 11, 2015; plus pictures

 

 

Appendix A

Initial Attendees:

Matt Hamsher- (Kidron)
Brad and Mindy Fraelich (Wooster)
Sue Steiner (Dalton)
Chet Eshlemen (Dover)
Lydell Steiner (Dalton)
Michael Amstutz- (Orrville)
Mark Leinbach- (Millersburg)
Myron Weaver (Berlin)
Gaye Santoro
Larry Augsburger- (Kidron)
Jim and Kim Hartman (Wooster)
Dave Limbach- (Dalton)
Marc Harvey
Phil Mcfarren- (Orrville)
Teresa Cusma (Canton)
David Brubaker, Facilitator of the meeting (Virginia)

 

Appendix B (See Photos Above)

 

Appendix C

November 2014

Center for Healthy Conflict management/Job description for steering committee

  • Goal:  Develop a platform for improving the conflict competence of residents and organizations in Holmes and Wayne Counties.  This will be achieved by:
  1. Networking: Identify and match current community assets (people/ organizations/resources) with community needs and opportunities
  2. Training: Develop capacity within individuals and organizations to address and manage conflict in healthy ways.
  3. Services: Respond to conflicts (families, businesses, churches, courts, neighbors) with tools like: facilitation, mediation, arbitration, circles, etc.
  • Guiding principles:
  1. Focus on the Holmes and Wayne counties
  2. Rooted in Christian faith and values, serving all faiths and backgrounds
  3. Organic (image of planting a seed), means taking time, not pushing for funding or relying heavily on capital
  4. Not rushing to articulate too much vision/direction before allowing the community to determine itself what it needs
  5. Non-profit is the preferred structure to pursue
  • Composition of Steering Committee
  1. 8-12 members
  2. Target launch date: February 2015
  3. Frequency of meetings:  10 Monthly meetings each year (taking a break in July and December) to be held at a central location yet to be determined
  4. Diverse group reflecting the broader community (see matrix for details)
  5. 2-year commitment
  6. Persons who have vested interest
  • Initial focus and responsibilities:
  1. Formalize vision, focus and possible name
  2. Clarify needs and opportunities
  3. Network with people and organizations, build asset map
  4. Formalize structure and vehicle for the organization to move forward ie. non-profit, partner with another organization, independent, etc.
  5. Develop training and service opportunities as outlined above

 

Appendix D

Steering committee: First meeting; February 23, 2015

  • Vision, Hopes, and Dreams

                a.  What is in my heart to see happen is for us to create opportunity that results in healthier relationships, that through healthy conflict resolution families, churches, and community can stay intact.

                b. How can we help people realize that they can change their position without needing to change their identity?  Conflict can sometimes be most intense when opposing “sides” hold intractable positions that are not open to change or compromise.

                c. We hope to teach elementary and high school students (and other members of our community) that there is a better, healthier way to resolve conflicts than what has often been modeled to them by parents or others in the community.

                d. We note that bringing together representation on this board already represents an effort to overcome some historical divides between:  a largely Amish/Mennonite population in eastern Holmes County and a largely Appalachian population in western Holmes County; Millersburg and Wooster; Swiss Mennonites in Wayne County and Amish Mennonites in Holmes County; older and younger generations; and rural and small cities.

                e. We have a vision to make mediation resources available for small businesses and their employees who may not have the resources available to larger businesses. 

                f. We desire to teach individuals conflict mediation skills and promote the importance of working through conflict in healthy ways rather than avoidance or violence.

                g. A question:  What does new forms of technology, like the internet and social media, mean for conflict mediation today?

                h. There are resources in the community to promote positive practices like forgiveness even though we may have lost some of the skills our parents and grandparents had in promoting good relationships with neighbors.

  • Helping people see civil discussion as an opportunity, not something to be feared
  • Being transformational in our culture—to see people as people, valuing relationships
  • Helping parents to communicate and work through conflict
  • Creating opportunities for conversation “we may not agree but we can still listen”
  • How will “conflict” be framed in our mission/vision statement?
  • Viewing healthy conflict as an opportunity as an opportunity for something better
  • Committing to listening toward mutual understanding
  • Resources, education and tools for conflict
  • Not trying to change others, but meeting others where they are
  • For people to own responsibility and be able to admit faults
  • Healthy conflict breeds intimacy:  common ground is not necessary for comfort ability
  • Strengthening relationship opportunities through conflict
  • How do we find conflict?  In other words, how do we learn about opportunities to teach, walk through conflict with others?  How do we get the word out?

 

Appendix E

Vision & Mission Statement Recap – August 11, 2015

  • Vision Statement:  The Vision Statement is our dream, our picture for ideal conditions, a unifying statement of our efforts, reminds us of what we are striving to reach, conveys hope for the future.
  • Following word wall brainstorming the group developed three vision statements in which we voted. Each member present voted two times.
  1. Reconciling Relationships; Developing Community (received 11 votes)
  2. Creating opportunities for restoration (received 6 votes)
  3. Creating opportunities for developing community and reconciliation (received 5 votes)
  • Following further discussion, the group decided to expand the top voted vision statement to read as follows:
  1. Opportunities for reconciling relationships and developing community
  • Mission Statement:  The Mission Statement is like an anchor that keeps our organization grounded, our purpose, our calling.
  • Following word wall brainstorming the group developed two mission statements in which we voted. Each member present voted one time.
  1. Transforming conflict into opportunities for improved relationships using education and dialogue. (received 6 votes)
  2. To transform the culture of conflict into opportunities for improved relationships using education and dialogue. (received 5 votes)

Appendix E Continued (See photos above)

 

 

Contact

  • Contact

    Connexus

    P.O. Box 412

    Berlin, Ohio 44610

    P:
    330.960.1175
    E:
    info@ourconnexus.com
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